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I have been visiting Walthamstow Wetlands in London for the past month: watching the birds, studying where our local tap water comes from and using the area around the reservoirs as my art studio – all part of my ongoing The Rivers Project. The exhibition The Rivers Project – ‘Flow in Progress’ in Leytonstone Library (6 Church Lane, London E11 1HG), which contains a series of photographic studies and collections created on my walks there. You can see those works in three original Art Deco cabinets until 31 October.

Cormorant Island, 2015 (detail), Silvia Krupinska

Cormorant Island, 2015 (detail), Silvia Krupinska

The installation in the large cabinet is called Cormorant Island (detail above), inspired by a couple of islands in Walthamstow Wetlands. The two window cabinets include some photographs from dipping the bramble hoop (now part of Cormorant Island installation) in the reservoirs on different days, capturing those moments in time and studying light, colour and movement. Each piece included in this show has a story behind it, whether that is of making, walking, spending time outdoors or meditating. Visit Walthamstow Wetlands and see for yourself…

Bramble Hoop in Coppermill Stream, 2015, Silvia Krupinska

Bramble Hoop in Coppermill Stream, 2015, Silvia Krupinska

Exhibition dates: 13.09.2015 – 31.10.2015

13.09. 2015, 12.00 pm – 4.00 pm and then on during normal library opening times:

Monday to Friday: 9am to 7pm
Saturday: 9am to 6pm
Sunday: 12 to 4pm

Follow news and updates:
Twitter: @silviakrupinska #theriversproject
Website: http://krupinska.wix.com/theriversproject
Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/silvia-krupinska

Grey Heron 02Pictures from trip 4 at Walthamstow Wetlands working on The Rivers Project. Apart from the bedeguar gall (the red fluffy thing below), herons were very approachable this time to my surprise. I was thrilled to have used my binoculars for the first time, too! It was truly one of the exceptional days.

Image below: Diplolepis rosae is not a lichen which I thought first. It’s an insect nest. Who would have thought? Read more about it here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diplolepis_rosae

Mysterious bedeguar gall at Walthamstow Wetlands 01

Grey Heron Walthamstow Wetlands 22 Aug 2015 01

This heron was standing in apparently its favourite spot. I’ve seen at least half dosen small fish trapted in his beak and eaten. You can just about to see one tiny fish in his beak in this photo too.

The Rivers Project at Work_ photo Paulo Estriga 01

The Rivers Project continues and this time I’m focusing my energy on a local place, oppose to one abroad in Slovakia. This new body of small scale works will be exhibited in a very local event too. The Leytonstone Library has been closed for a while, but it’s due to reopen with a big launch on Saturday 12th September. Once it’s open, my works will be on display for about a month, details are to be seen. I have no time to spare to be ready on time! Come and walk with me! And of course, please join us at the big opening in Leytonstone, if you are around! The series begins…

Here I am :

You can listen to my sound notes from the third visit in Walthamstow Wetlands on recorded on 16th August 2015. This is best to listen if you need to relax or just escape for a while. No rushing there but simple explorations. The notes are unedited and leave about 20 min to hear it in full. When I refer to a bird family of Bitterns, now I know they were Moots actually!

Canadian goose 02

Canada Goose, Walthamstow Wetlands, 16.08.2015

Canadian geese family 03

Canada Geese family, Walthamstow Wetlands, 13.08.2015

Blueberries 05

Those blackberries I’m talking about in the recording.

Creeping thistle 01

I’ve collected some thistle seeds. They are so soft!

Canadian gees picking on blackberries 04

Geese munching on blackberries, Walthamstow Wetlands, 13.08.2015.

Swans 03

Two beautiful Mute Swans, Walthamstow Wetlands, 11.08.2015.

willow tree 02

My favourite willow tree at Walthamstow Wetlands, 13.08.2015

willow tree 01

My favourite willow tree touching the water and creating some shelter from the rain. Thankfully! At Walthamstow Wetlands, 13.08.2015

Rainny day and canadian geese 09

They don’t mind the rain I think. At Walthamstow Wetlands, 13.08.2015

Grey heron walthamstow wetlands 01

Ever so shy Grey Heron at Walthamstow Wetlands, 16.08.2015

Common tern and gulls 02

Common tern (right) and gulls.

Cormorant island 01

Cormorant island at Walthanstow Wetlands, 13.08.2015.





This is a report I wrote for The UAL Postgraduate Community newsletter and blog. You can also read it directly in a slightly edited version here.

I’m a big fan of Postgraduate Community’s trips and events, I often attend when I can. This time it was Professor Rob Kesseler, UAL Chair of Art, Design & Science who was proposing to take 10 students to The Microscience Microscopy Congress 2015 in Manchester for free!! I’m studying on MA Art &Science, but my background is in art. This presented a perfect opportunity to see The Frieze Art Fair of microscopy, and an opportunity to engage with scientists and see their world.
We arrived in Manchester on Wednesday midday, July 1st on a cool air-conditioned train, which, believe me, was much appreciated, as that was the hottest day of the year! After a short walk, observing the architecture we arrived at Manchester Central. The bustle of science minds had started. The exhibition hall was filled with top new microscopy inventions and leading experts in the fields.

I wanted to just get a feel for such a place. My recent, The Rivers Project was my excuse to talk with the brainy scientists and listen to their “foreign” language. I explained why I was there and that I hoped to find a collaborator, to gain an insight to what’s hiding in a riverbed of a river I was studying at the time. When I failed to define a precise reason why I needed the microscopy to help me to progress my work, then I saw an exhibitor from France, a company called Digital Surf. You know that feeling when you can finally visualize your idea? Talking with them, ever so friendly as all the exhibitors, I knew this company might be helpful. We exchanged our business cards and now after a couple of emails, there seems to be a great chance we will collaborate on The Rivers Project with their software. But even, if this doesn’t work out, the approachable attitude of the scientists there and all the thought-provoking chats we had, individually, or the whole group of us from UAL, was definitely worth it!

Thank you for engaging with my blog, and please feel to leave any comments below the image.
MMC2015 Digital Surf

Digital Surf exhibition stand at MMC 2015

When I saw a public call for stallholders at #TransActing: A Market of Values by Critical Practice, I thought it looked like a very unusual event. It wasn’t an art fair, nor an exhibition, it wasn’t a normal market either. A new concept of re-evaluating, transacting, exchanging, and giving sounded like something I’d love to engage with.

TransActing flyer

You can read about the thrill of being chosen to participate at TransActing in my previous blog here.

I’d like to say a big thank you to Joey O’Gorman, Research Affiliate, MA Art and Science at CSM, UAL. Joey introduced me to a social scientist, geographer Richard Bater with whom I collaborated during the #TransActing: A Market of Values event. Richard’s work focuses on (as he described it) “research and the intersection of scientific (watery) knowledge and artistic interventions, so he very much approaches water less from a natural scientific perspective than from a shape-shifting transdisciplinarian one (undergirded by anthropology)”. Compared to Richard’s, my interest lies in rivers and water more from an angle of sculpting, art, and physical geography. I find movements of sediments, fluvial forms and processes inspiring and fascinating. I look at them as a metaphor to artist sculpting, building objects. (Question of conscious sculpting and process comes up at this point).

TransActing The Rivers Project 04w

Our stall named The Rivers Project was painted white and The Flowing Roots sculpture grew right through it. The aim for this one-day collaboration between Richard and I was to create discussions about rivers, water, and ecology. We traded water for words into our Water Word Harvest. We asked two questions. What does water mean to you? Do you have your own nature, a place where you go to relax outdoors? Thank you to all people who engaged with our stall! Thank you for the debates and chats. They were indeed very inspiring, interesting, and useful.

TransActing The Rivers Project 06w

TransActing The Rivers Project 01w

TransActing The Rivers Project 03w

TransActing The Rivers Project 05w

TransActing The Rivers Project 07w

TransActing The Rivers Project 08w

TransActing The Rivers Project 09w

What’s next for The Rivers Projects? Richard and I will work together again and I’m beginning to write a dissertation, which will be drip-fed by the Water Word Harvest, critical thinking, evaluation, and partly by amazing River Thames cartoons by John Leech (1817–1864), who was an English caricaturist and illustrator. Check out this amazing piece on Wikipedia.

I have one regret looking back at the event. 60+ amazing stallholders had lots to offer and engage with. We were in our water-bubble all day and didn’t have enough time to speak to all the others. Just look at the variety of projects on the day here.

TransActing happened on Saturday July 11, 2015, 12 – 5 pm, at Rootstein Hopkins Parade Ground, located between Tate Britain and Chelsea College of Arts. Thank you to Critical Practice, who organized it! Check out this photo to see the stalls on the day from high above.

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