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Hello nature, art, and outdoor enthusiasts! I’m doing a walk in Walthamstow Wetlands on Sunday 20th November, at 12-2pm. Book your free ticket here.

The walk is happening in conjunction with a sculptural installation Floating Reedbed in Tracing Wastelands group exhibition (The Depot Clapton). The exhibition evolved through a collaboration between MA Art and Science at Central Saint Martins, and the Government Office for Science. This walk is kindly supported by London Wildlife Trust’s Lead Community Engagement Volunteer Stephen Ayers.

steel-plaster-paint-by-silvia-krupinska-2016-websize

Credits: Steel, plaster, paint or Floating Reedbed (2016) by Silvia Krupinska

 

Arrive 11.50am – 12.00pm. Meeting at the Ferry Lane entrance to the reservoirs opposite the Ferry Boat Inn, outside the Thames Water Rangers’ office. Nearest tube station is Tottenham Hale and Blackhorse Road. It is about 7 min walk from both stations. Buses are available. (Please note you must book a free ticket as places are limited. Thank you.)

Start 12.00pm
Walk through Walthamstow Wetlands
 Finish 2.00pm (and then you can join me to see the exhibition after, if you like  :).

*Adults only as the site is still in development. No dogs allowed except guide dogs and assistance dogs. If you wish to extend your visit after our official time (12-2pm) you will need to purchase a day birdwatcher’s pass £1 from the Ranger’s Office. (Cash only) The places on the walk are strictly available only by booking a free ticket. On the occasion that you no longer can join us and you booked your free ticket, please release the ticket.

Book your free ticket here.

To find out more about the exhibition and its location, follow this link to another blog post. Many thanks, see you soon!

 

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It’s been fun this weekend. I was transported back to our MA Art and Science Degree Show at CSM, as I was editing a video to be part of my application for International Student Innovation Award. Wish me luck. Hopefully, this 4 min video sketch will give an insight of what the Studio Hide installation was like at CSM. Until it is installed somewhere else 🙂

Walthamstow Wetlands and their surroundings are undergoing some major upgrades and natural habitat improvements before it opens for free to visitors in spring 2017. There is a broken hide in Walthamstow Wetlands that is awaiting a repair as well. I was able to peak into it. I’ve lost count how many times I’ve imagined what it would be like if I had an art studio in the wetlands. The broken hide would be a perfect art studio!

Broken hide by Krupinska 2 10Broken hide by Krupinska 3 10

Until I make this happen and I draw up my plans for an existing art studio in the wetlands, I’m making an installation called Studio Hide as part of Unfolding Realities MA art and Science Degree Show. This is situated in the Street of Central Saint Martins, in the heart of the what used to be a Grain Store for arriving trains at Kings Cross. The new Studio Hide artwork has started to take shape this week, as we’ve commenced installing our Degree Show. Studio Hide contains materials (#materialcollection) I’ve found in Walthamstow Wetlands. All twigs, egg shells, sticks have been found by me and picked from the ground during the different times of the year, over past 9 months.

No trees have been harmed in the production of my Studio Hide.

My aim is to share with a wide audience visiting the Degree Show, what is the meaning of my local landscape. This urban nature reserve contains ten large water reservoirs from which 30% of Londoners get their drinking water supply from. It is beautiful and rich, it provides me with bottomless inspiration. 

Each time I visit Walthamstow Wetlands I find something new. For example, yesterday I spotted for the first time a yellow-bellied slider turtle in Coppermill Stream (pictured below) and I was able to get really close to a cheeky cormorant winding up a hard working coot couple, keeping up their nest.

Yellow bellied slider by Krupinska 2016

 

Following images are of Studio Hide work in progress taken at my MA Art and Science Studio at CSM or during last week’s degree show installation.

Silvia Krupinska, work in progress for Unfolding Realities 2016 degree show 02

Krupinska work in progress

Silvia Krupinska, work in progress for Unfolding Realities 2016 degree show 06Silvia Krupinska, work in progress for Unfolding Realities 2016 degree show 01Silvia Krupinska, work in progress for Unfolding Realities 2016 degree show 07Silvia Krupinska, work in progress for Unfolding Realities 2016 degree show 04Silvia Krupinska, Studio Hide install, Unfolding Realities 2016 degree show 09

Degree Show | 25-29 May 2016

DATES | Wed 25th – Sun 29th May 2016

LOCATION | Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts London, 1 Granary Square, London N1C 4AA, United Kingdom

OPENING TIMES | Wed to Fri 12.00 – 20.00 | Sat to Sun 12.00 – 18.00

UNFOLDING REALITIES presents the work of 20 MA Art and Science graduates at Central Saint Martins. Since its inception in 2011 this pioneering course, the first of its kind, has provided a unique global platform for students across a wide range of fields, on which they extend and contribute to the expanding interdisciplinary branch of knowledge – Art and Science. Responding to this fast emerging territory for collaborative practice which redefines creativity across disciplines, UNFOLDING REALITIES practitioners from fine art, design, photography, neuroscience, art history, mathematics, choreography and architecture have been inspired by their individual connections and observations of the world and the challenge of interrogating this beyond disciplinary boundaries.

 

 

 

Over past months, a lot of exciting has happened. I’ve dived into Walthamstow Wetlands research and met some fantastic people in and outside of my MA Art and Science at CSM. One of which is my valued collaborator Dr Johanne Orchard-Webb, Research Fellow, Lee Valley Team of Hydrocitizenship – arts and humanities project funded by AHRC. It has been a true pleasure to exchange ideas and experiences with Jo. She has written a fantastic post about the ways how our collaboration has developed and what it has entailed so far.

Dr Jo Orchard-Webb wrote:

“While we have used different approaches to exploring ideas around what we call ‘hydrocitizenship’, there is a good deal of common ground in our thematic findings, and this ongoing process of research collaboration has for me highlighted the importance of multi-disciplinary teams working together to explore and understand hydro-social relations.”

To read the full post and find out more, please click on the following link.

Many thanks

‘Fisherman’s Flies’ by Silvia Krupinska. Image taken at Walthamstow Wetlands, on one of the orientation walks organised by London Wildlife Trust.

Fisherman's Flies by Silvia Krupinska 2016

Grey Heron 02Pictures from trip 4 at Walthamstow Wetlands working on The Rivers Project. Apart from the bedeguar gall (the red fluffy thing below), herons were very approachable this time to my surprise. I was thrilled to have used my binoculars for the first time, too! It was truly one of the exceptional days.

Image below: Diplolepis rosae is not a lichen which I thought first. It’s an insect nest. Who would have thought? Read more about it here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diplolepis_rosae

Mysterious bedeguar gall at Walthamstow Wetlands 01

Grey Heron Walthamstow Wetlands 22 Aug 2015 01

This heron was standing in apparently its favourite spot. I’ve seen at least half dosen small fish trapted in his beak and eaten. You can just about to see one tiny fish in his beak in this photo too.

The Rivers Project at Work_ photo Paulo Estriga 01

The Rivers Project continues and this time I’m focusing my energy on a local place, oppose to one abroad in Slovakia. This new body of small scale works will be exhibited in a very local event too. The Leytonstone Library has been closed for a while, but it’s due to reopen with a big launch on Saturday 12th September. Once it’s open, my works will be on display for about a month, details are to be seen. I have no time to spare to be ready on time! Come and walk with me! And of course, please join us at the big opening in Leytonstone, if you are around! The series begins…

Here I am :

You can listen to my sound notes from the third visit in Walthamstow Wetlands on recorded on 16th August 2015. This is best to listen if you need to relax or just escape for a while. No rushing there but simple explorations. The notes are unedited and leave about 20 min to hear it in full. When I refer to a bird family of Bitterns, now I know they were Moots actually!

Canadian goose 02

Canada Goose, Walthamstow Wetlands, 16.08.2015

Canadian geese family 03

Canada Geese family, Walthamstow Wetlands, 13.08.2015

Blueberries 05

Those blackberries I’m talking about in the recording.

Creeping thistle 01

I’ve collected some thistle seeds. They are so soft!

Canadian gees picking on blackberries 04

Geese munching on blackberries, Walthamstow Wetlands, 13.08.2015.

Swans 03

Two beautiful Mute Swans, Walthamstow Wetlands, 11.08.2015.

willow tree 02

My favourite willow tree at Walthamstow Wetlands, 13.08.2015

willow tree 01

My favourite willow tree touching the water and creating some shelter from the rain. Thankfully! At Walthamstow Wetlands, 13.08.2015

Rainny day and canadian geese 09

They don’t mind the rain I think. At Walthamstow Wetlands, 13.08.2015

Grey heron walthamstow wetlands 01

Ever so shy Grey Heron at Walthamstow Wetlands, 16.08.2015

Common tern and gulls 02

Common tern (right) and gulls.

Cormorant island 01

Cormorant island at Walthanstow Wetlands, 13.08.2015.





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