It’s been fun this weekend. I was transported back to our MA Art and Science Degree Show at CSM, as I was editing a video to be part of my application for International Student Innovation Award. Wish me luck. Hopefully, this 4 min video sketch will give an insight of what the Studio Hide installation was like at CSM. Until it is installed somewhere else🙂

What’s next? I’ll be presenting a Pecha Kucha style presentation at Walking Artists’ event at Somerset House this summer on Sunday 17 July during 11.30 – 12.30 slot. Look for more in the links below. Drop in if you have time, it should be fun!

Facebook event and Somerset House Walking Women event week

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My reflections about Studio Hide are published in Waltham Forest independent newspaper. Please download the article via this link and head to page 6. Cheers!

Waltham Forest Echo Studio Hide snap

 

Walthamstow Wetlands and their surroundings are undergoing some major upgrades and natural habitat improvements before it opens for free to visitors in spring 2017. There is a broken hide in Walthamstow Wetlands that is awaiting a repair as well. I was able to peak into it. I’ve lost count how many times I’ve imagined what it would be like if I had an art studio in the wetlands. The broken hide would be a perfect art studio!

Broken hide by Krupinska 2 10Broken hide by Krupinska 3 10

Until I make this happen and I draw up my plans for an existing art studio in the wetlands, I’m making an installation called Studio Hide as part of Unfolding Realities MA art and Science Degree Show. This is situated in the Street of Central Saint Martins, in the heart of the what used to be a Grain Store for arriving trains at Kings Cross. The new Studio Hide artwork has started to take shape this week, as we’ve commenced installing our Degree Show. Studio Hide contains materials (#materialcollection) I’ve found in Walthamstow Wetlands. All twigs, egg shells, sticks have been found by me and picked from the ground during the different times of the year, over past 9 months.

No trees have been harmed in the production of my Studio Hide.

My aim is to share with a wide audience visiting the Degree Show, what is the meaning of my local landscape. This urban nature reserve contains ten large water reservoirs from which 30% of Londoners get their drinking water supply from. It is beautiful and rich, it provides me with bottomless inspiration. 

Each time I visit Walthamstow Wetlands I find something new. For example, yesterday I spotted for the first time a yellow-bellied slider turtle in Coppermill Stream (pictured below) and I was able to get really close to a cheeky cormorant winding up a hard working coot couple, keeping up their nest.

Yellow bellied slider by Krupinska 2016

 

Following images are of Studio Hide work in progress taken at my MA Art and Science Studio at CSM or during last week’s degree show installation.

Silvia Krupinska, work in progress for Unfolding Realities 2016 degree show 02

Krupinska work in progress

Silvia Krupinska, work in progress for Unfolding Realities 2016 degree show 06Silvia Krupinska, work in progress for Unfolding Realities 2016 degree show 01Silvia Krupinska, work in progress for Unfolding Realities 2016 degree show 07Silvia Krupinska, work in progress for Unfolding Realities 2016 degree show 04Silvia Krupinska, Studio Hide install, Unfolding Realities 2016 degree show 09

Degree Show | 25-29 May 2016

DATES | Wed 25th – Sun 29th May 2016

LOCATION | Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts London, 1 Granary Square, London N1C 4AA, United Kingdom

OPENING TIMES | Wed to Fri 12.00 – 20.00 | Sat to Sun 12.00 – 18.00

UNFOLDING REALITIES presents the work of 20 MA Art and Science graduates at Central Saint Martins. Since its inception in 2011 this pioneering course, the first of its kind, has provided a unique global platform for students across a wide range of fields, on which they extend and contribute to the expanding interdisciplinary branch of knowledge – Art and Science. Responding to this fast emerging territory for collaborative practice which redefines creativity across disciplines, UNFOLDING REALITIES practitioners from fine art, design, photography, neuroscience, art history, mathematics, choreography and architecture have been inspired by their individual connections and observations of the world and the challenge of interrogating this beyond disciplinary boundaries.

 

 

 

90 years ago, a fossilized cast of a skull (endocranium) was found in Ganovce, Slovakia. The most important Slovakian treasure of similar kind, dating back 120 thousand years. I’m from Poprad near Ganovce and I’ve always been interested in this story in connection to the local mineral springs. The story describes a Neanderthal female getting dizzy breathing poisonous gasses from the Hradok Spring and dying.

Two of my artworks in One Country Three Worlds exhibition at Embassy of the Slovak Republic in London (20 Apr-27 May) celebrate the fossil and the place. The article link offers some further reading in the Slovak language.

The image below is the place where the Neanderthal fossil was found by stonemason Koloman Koki – Ganovce near Poprad.

Hradok, Ganovce by Silvia Krupinska

Neanderthal Memorial 2014 by Silvia Krupinska (Digital print 1/1)

Pocta Fosilu Mozgu 01

Dried flowers in this piece were collected at Hradok in Ganovce. The outline is representing the size and the shape of the fossil. Thanks to Podtatranské múzeum v Poprade who generously helped me in the research for this project.

Endocranium_2014_Silvia Krupinska before fading 01

DATES: Wed 20th April – Fri 27th May 2016
LOCATION: Embassy of Slovakia, 25 Kensington Palace Gardens, London W8 4QY
OPENING TIMES: Monday–Friday 13:00–15:00| 25–27 May extended 9:00–15:00, 20 May closed due to an event taking place.

FREE ENTRY

PLEASE RING BELL ‘RECEPTION’ TO ACCESS THE EXHIBITION. THANK YOU!

#1country3worlds

Facebook event

Press release link

It’s fast approaching. I can’t believe the time has passed so quickly and our degree show is open to public at the end of May! I’ll present a sculptural installation Studio Hide, including this Dead Plastic Bird sculpture below, shown as work in progress.

dead plastic bird, social media 01

“New innovative work by pioneering Central Saint Martins graduates, that challenges the concept of fine art through interdisciplinary practice.”

DATES | Wed 25th – Sun 29th May 2016

LOCATION | Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts London, 1 Granary Square, London N1C 4AA, United Kingdom

OPENING TIMES | Wed to Fri 12.00 – 20.00 | Sat to Sun 12.00 – 18.00

UNFOLDING REALITIES presents the work of 20 MA Art and Science graduates at Central Saint Martins. Since its inception in 2011 this pioneering course, the first of its kind, has provided a unique global platform for students across a wide range of fields, on which they extend and contribute to the expanding interdisciplinary branch of knowledge – Art and Science. Responding to this fast emerging territory for collaborative practice which redefines creativity across disciplines, UNFOLDING REALITIES practitioners from fine art, design, photography, neuroscience, art history, mathematics, choreography and architecture have been inspired by their individual connections and observations of the world and the challenge of interrogating this beyond disciplinary boundaries.Unfolding Realities A3-POSTER-1Facebook event    Facebook page  Twitter: @artsciencecsm

 

A year ago Mira Varg and I created a sculpture for Embassy of the Slovak Republic in London. This post from earlier describes it. On Monday 11 May a very interesting invitation arrived from the same Embassy. Artists Mira Varg, Mandy Hreus and I, all taking MA Art and Science and Slovakian, were invited to exhibit there, with a little over a week till the opening! How could we refuse such a challenge? Those had been amongst the most exciting days this year for me. The planning, the install of the show has given us a pretty good boost and practice for approaching Unfolding Realities degree show in May.

One country three worlds flyer 1200px

To view One Country Three Worlds images on Facebook, follow this link.

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One Country Three Worlds (20 April–27 May 2016) is an exhibition by three Slovak artists living and creating in the UK. Hreus, Krupinska and Varg met while studying for their MA in Art & Science at Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts London and show their work at the Embassy of the Slovak Republic for the first time, while simultaneously preparing for their degree show in May. One Country Three Worlds is a celebration of three different interpretations of the world by three creative minds originating from the same country – Slovakia.

While embracing their differences, the three artists have something in common. They are intrigued by the individual and collective perception and experience of our surroundings. Varg is reflecting on variations of realities and how we humanly observe them, Krupinska is focusing on the texture of landscape and hidden places, and Hreus is investigating the visible and invisible electromagnetic spectrum in relation to consciousness and pure expansive awareness. These interpretations unfold in a palette of media, ranging from photography, print to sculpture and installation.”

DATES: Wed 20th April – Fri 27th May 2016
LOCATION: Embassy of Slovakia, 25 Kensington Palace Gardens, London W8 4QY
OPENING TIMES: Monday–Friday 13:00–15:00| 25–27 May extended 9:00–15:00, 20 May closed due to an event taking place.

FREE ENTRY

#1country3worlds

PLEASE RING BELL ‘RECEPTION’ TO ACCESS THE EXHIBITION. THANK YOU!

Facebook event

Press release link

 

Over past months, a lot of exciting has happened. I’ve dived into Walthamstow Wetlands research and met some fantastic people in and outside of my MA Art and Science at CSM. One of which is my valued collaborator Dr Johanne Orchard-Webb, Research Fellow, Lee Valley Team of Hydrocitizenship – arts and humanities project funded by AHRC. It has been a true pleasure to exchange ideas and experiences with Jo. She has written a fantastic post about the ways how our collaboration has developed and what it has entailed so far.

Dr Jo Orchard-Webb wrote:

“While we have used different approaches to exploring ideas around what we call ‘hydrocitizenship’, there is a good deal of common ground in our thematic findings, and this ongoing process of research collaboration has for me highlighted the importance of multi-disciplinary teams working together to explore and understand hydro-social relations.”

To read the full post and find out more, please click on the following link.

Many thanks

‘Fisherman’s Flies’ by Silvia Krupinska. Image taken at Walthamstow Wetlands, on one of the orientation walks organised by London Wildlife Trust.

Fisherman's Flies by Silvia Krupinska 2016

It’s been now six months since I’ve discovered Walthamstow Wetlands. The place has become my research and relaxation hub. I normally announce most of my news on Twitter (@silviakrupinska), but it’s about time I touched down here, on my blog. The truth is, apart from my MA Art and Science dissertation (pictured below) which I handed in early February, I haven’t done much other writing lately. On the other hand, I’ve been focusing on my sketchbook and thinking about my degree show concept.

Silvia Krupinska Dissertation Cover MA Art and Science 2016

Silvia Krupinska sketchbook 2016 01

Silvia Krupinska sketchbook 2016 02

February and March have been very dynamic, indeed. We’ve done extremely successful degree show fundraising  art and science themed workshops.

Another bit of big news is that Government Office for Science invited us, CSM MA Art and Science, to collaborate with them on a report about waste. Five of us gave a series of 5 min presentations about our work and what we get to do on our MA, at GO-Science offices in London. My contribution was a presentation from my journies in Walthamstow Wetlands, as a taster really, there is so much to tell. The slideshow below is a selection of images from that presentation. It’s rather early days for this collaboration. I’ll bring more details in another post as it develops. One thing assured, it is very exciting!

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Meanwhile, there is another event coming up this Friday, 18 March 2016 at Vestry House Museum in Walthamstow. Organised by Love the Lea, Thames 21 campaign to save the rivers of the Lea catchment, who invited me to participate.Love the Lea event March 2016

I’ll bring a large map drawing of Walthamstow Wetlands to the event, and with it, I’ll create an installation to lead people on my journeys. I’ll have collected specimen samples, lots of printed images for visitors to browse, and I can give you tips on what are the most interesting corners to explore in the wetlands, the way I see it. If the weather permits, I’m also going to install my thorny stick ladder in the garden.

It would be great to see you there. Come for a chat and I’ll tell you the ladder’s story.

Until then, take care. S.

Love the Lea Late, Silvia Krupinska indoor installation proposal, detail 02

Love the Lea Late, Silvia Krupinska outdoor installation proposal 01

 

 

MA Art and Science staff and students are offering a range of creative workshops exploring observations and experimentations in art and science on Saturday 5 and 12 March, at Central Saint Martins.

Come along and get hands on with slime mould problem solving, microbial image making, nebula bottling, water mapping, microscopy inspired glass sculpting and chemigram making. Creative art and science workshops are designed for adults and young people.Young people must be 12+ and accompanied by an adult.

All proceeds go towards the MA Art and Science Degree Show (open to the public 25-29 May 2016).

Cost: £14 adult | £12 UAL staff/student | £9 child/senior/unemployed
(discounts available when you book two or more workshops, applied at checkout)

See details and booking links below…

1lookingglass

 

MA ART AND SCIENCE WORKSHOP #1

Through the Looking Glass & Microbial Me

5 March 2016, 11:00 – 13:00

Through the Looking Glass (with Jenny Walsh)
Glass played a crucial role in enabling man to see beyond the visual eye. In this workshop discover how skilled craftsmen learned to grind glass and change its composition to revolutionise the way we investigate the microscopic world. Inspired by microscopic images each participant will be invited to create their own microscope slide using glass confetti and stringers.

and

Microbial Me (with Mellissa Fisher)
Learn about the invisible world on your skin, think about your own microbes and design your own microbial portrait using a painting technique and collage. Each person will have their own microbial face to take home along with knowledge about bacteria!

BOOK THIS WORKSHOP

Attentive Topologies and Water Mapping workshop by Beckie Leach and Silvia Krupinska

 

MA ART AND SCIENCE WORKSHOP #2

Attentive Topologies & Water Mapping

5 March 2016, 14:00 – 16:00

Attentive Topologies and Water Mapping (with Beckie Leach & Silvia Krupinska)
Focusing on the canal area next to Granary Square in Kings Cross (in front of Central Saint Martins), this workshop will guide you through a series of attentiveness exercises exploring sound and water. You will find out about phenomenological approaches to artistic practice and water/sound quality, and create expressive maps capturing the movement of water and sound.

BOOK THIS WORKSHOP

3slimemould

 

MA ART AND SCIENCE WORKSHOP #3

Slime Mould Boot Camp

12 March 2016, 11:00 – 13:00

Slime Mould Boot Camp (with Heather Barnett)
The slime mould, Physarum polycephalum, is a small brainless protozoa with surprising intelligence. Used as a model organism in many areas of scientific research it also makes for a great creative collaborator. In this workshop you will discover the fascinating role this single celled organism has to play in the cultures of science and art, and design a practical experiment to test its capabilities and problem-solving skills. Each participant will take home a new microbial pet to observe and experiment with.

BOOK THIS WORKSHOP

2chemigram

 

MA ART AND SCIENCE WORKSHOP #4

The Chemigram Spell & Bottle Your Own Nebula

12 March 2016, 14:00 – 16:00

The Chemigram Spell (with Don Li & Mira Varg)
Offering some fresh air in the midst of a digital age, the workshop explores the potential of analogue photographic processes through a hands-on session, working with tools and materials that are unconventionally related to photographic processes – including paint brushes, syringes, honey and varnish. Come and experience the magic of an alternative image making process.

and

Bottle Your Own Nebula (with Carla Mancillas Serna)
Nebulas are massive clouds of interstellar dust in space, mainly composed of helium and hydrogen and other chemical elements. They are also known as “stellar nurseries”. These clouds of different shapes, sizes and colours coalesce in space, collapse and give birth to stars and planetary systems, like our own solar system. Learn about how nebulae form and create your own bottled cloud inspired by the colours and textures of cosmic dust.

BOOK THIS WORKSHOP

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Bottle Your Own Nebula

Q-Art invited me to present at their open crit, back in November. It all took a place in Mall Galleries, London. After I briefly introduced my art and research influenced by a variation of water themes I asked questions relating to my degree show planning for May 2016 when my MA Art and Science will culminate. The feedback, comments and suggestions have been really useful. Thank you to all that contributed. Thank you Q-Art! For more images visit this link. Cheers!

String Ladder, Mall Galleries, Q Art 06

 

I have been visiting Walthamstow Wetlands in London for the past month: watching the birds, studying where our local tap water comes from and using the area around the reservoirs as my art studio – all part of my ongoing The Rivers Project. The exhibition The Rivers Project – ‘Flow in Progress’ in Leytonstone Library (6 Church Lane, London E11 1HG), which contains a series of photographic studies and collections created on my walks there. You can see those works in three original Art Deco cabinets until 31 October.

Cormorant Island, 2015 (detail), Silvia Krupinska

Cormorant Island, 2015 (detail), Silvia Krupinska

The installation in the large cabinet is called Cormorant Island (detail above), inspired by a couple of islands in Walthamstow Wetlands. The two window cabinets include some photographs from dipping the bramble hoop (now part of Cormorant Island installation) in the reservoirs on different days, capturing those moments in time and studying light, colour and movement. Each piece included in this show has a story behind it, whether that is of making, walking, spending time outdoors or meditating. Visit Walthamstow Wetlands and see for yourself…

Bramble Hoop in Coppermill Stream, 2015, Silvia Krupinska

Bramble Hoop in Coppermill Stream, 2015, Silvia Krupinska

Exhibition dates: 13.09.2015 – 31.10.2015

13.09. 2015, 12.00 pm – 4.00 pm and then on during normal library opening times:

Monday to Friday: 9am to 7pm
Saturday: 9am to 6pm
Sunday: 12 to 4pm

Follow news and updates:
Twitter: @silviakrupinska #theriversproject
Website: http://krupinska.wix.com/theriversproject
Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/silvia-krupinska

Grey Heron 02Pictures from trip 4 at Walthamstow Wetlands working on The Rivers Project. Apart from the bedeguar gall (the red fluffy thing below), herons were very approachable this time to my surprise. I was thrilled to have used my binoculars for the first time, too! It was truly one of the exceptional days.

Image below: Diplolepis rosae is not a lichen which I thought first. It’s an insect nest. Who would have thought? Read more about it here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diplolepis_rosae

Mysterious bedeguar gall at Walthamstow Wetlands 01

Grey Heron Walthamstow Wetlands 22 Aug 2015 01

This heron was standing in apparently its favourite spot. I’ve seen at least half dosen small fish trapted in his beak and eaten. You can just about to see one tiny fish in his beak in this photo too.

The Rivers Project at Work_ photo Paulo Estriga 01

“What are you cooking?” My boyfriend asked. “I’m making some berry inks, of course!” I answered.

Cooking inks 02

Cooking the berries and the leaves to extract the colour for the inks. I’ve added a bit of vinegar to stabilize the colour, which might slow down the colour fading too.

inks and testing 01

Testing of inks and left over pulp on paper

Medlar berries 03

Can’t find which berry this is. Anyone?

Elder berries 02

Elderberry

Dried brown plant 01

Dried brown plant of unknown name. Do you know it?

Blueberries 09

Blackberry

Purple Loosestrife 01

Purple Loosestrife

Thistle seeds 02

Thistle seeds

Thistle seeds 03

Thistle seeds

Sample of berry inks 01

Here you can see how different the colours look compared to the testing on the image higher up. The blackberry changed much darker and the top line with elderberry darkened but kept its red accents. The yellow tea like stains are from on the right mixed leaves and on the left a random mix.

Mixed leaves 01

Mixed leaf selection

Inks 03

Now I need to use the inks, more about that soon, cheers!

The Rivers Project continues and this time I’m focusing my energy on a local place, oppose to one abroad in Slovakia. This new body of small scale works will be exhibited in a very local event too. The Leytonstone Library has been closed for a while, but it’s due to reopen with a big launch on Saturday 12th September. Once it’s open, my works will be on display for about a month, details are to be seen. I have no time to spare to be ready on time! Come and walk with me! And of course, please join us at the big opening in Leytonstone, if you are around! The series begins…

Here I am :

You can listen to my sound notes from the third visit in Walthamstow Wetlands on recorded on 16th August 2015. This is best to listen if you need to relax or just escape for a while. No rushing there but simple explorations. The notes are unedited and leave about 20 min to hear it in full. When I refer to a bird family of Bitterns, now I know they were Moots actually!

Canadian goose 02

Canada Goose, Walthamstow Wetlands, 16.08.2015

Canadian geese family 03

Canada Geese family, Walthamstow Wetlands, 13.08.2015

Blueberries 05

Those blackberries I’m talking about in the recording.

Creeping thistle 01

I’ve collected some thistle seeds. They are so soft!

Canadian gees picking on blackberries 04

Geese munching on blackberries, Walthamstow Wetlands, 13.08.2015.

Swans 03

Two beautiful Mute Swans, Walthamstow Wetlands, 11.08.2015.

willow tree 02

My favourite willow tree at Walthamstow Wetlands, 13.08.2015

willow tree 01

My favourite willow tree touching the water and creating some shelter from the rain. Thankfully! At Walthamstow Wetlands, 13.08.2015

Rainny day and canadian geese 09

They don’t mind the rain I think. At Walthamstow Wetlands, 13.08.2015

Grey heron walthamstow wetlands 01

Ever so shy Grey Heron at Walthamstow Wetlands, 16.08.2015

Common tern and gulls 02

Common tern (right) and gulls.

Cormorant island 01

Cormorant island at Walthanstow Wetlands, 13.08.2015.





This is a report I wrote for The UAL Postgraduate Community newsletter and blog. You can also read it directly in a slightly edited version here.

I’m a big fan of Postgraduate Community’s trips and events, I often attend when I can. This time it was Professor Rob Kesseler, UAL Chair of Art, Design & Science who was proposing to take 10 students to The Microscience Microscopy Congress 2015 in Manchester for free!! I’m studying on MA Art &Science, but my background is in art. This presented a perfect opportunity to see The Frieze Art Fair of microscopy, and an opportunity to engage with scientists and see their world.
We arrived in Manchester on Wednesday midday, July 1st on a cool air-conditioned train, which, believe me, was much appreciated, as that was the hottest day of the year! After a short walk, observing the architecture we arrived at Manchester Central. The bustle of science minds had started. The exhibition hall was filled with top new microscopy inventions and leading experts in the fields.

I wanted to just get a feel for such a place. My recent, The Rivers Project was my excuse to talk with the brainy scientists and listen to their “foreign” language. I explained why I was there and that I hoped to find a collaborator, to gain an insight to what’s hiding in a riverbed of a river I was studying at the time. When I failed to define a precise reason why I needed the microscopy to help me to progress my work, then I saw an exhibitor from France, a company called Digital Surf. You know that feeling when you can finally visualize your idea? Talking with them, ever so friendly as all the exhibitors, I knew this company might be helpful. We exchanged our business cards and now after a couple of emails, there seems to be a great chance we will collaborate on The Rivers Project with their software. But even, if this doesn’t work out, the approachable attitude of the scientists there and all the thought-provoking chats we had, individually, or the whole group of us from UAL, was definitely worth it!

Thank you for engaging with my blog, and please feel to leave any comments below the image.
MMC2015 Digital Surf

Digital Surf exhibition stand at MMC 2015

When I saw a public call for stallholders at #TransActing: A Market of Values by Critical Practice, I thought it looked like a very unusual event. It wasn’t an art fair, nor an exhibition, it wasn’t a normal market either. A new concept of re-evaluating, transacting, exchanging, and giving sounded like something I’d love to engage with.

TransActing flyer

You can read about the thrill of being chosen to participate at TransActing in my previous blog here.

I’d like to say a big thank you to Joey O’Gorman, Research Affiliate, MA Art and Science at CSM, UAL. Joey introduced me to a social scientist, geographer Richard Bater with whom I collaborated during the #TransActing: A Market of Values event. Richard’s work focuses on (as he described it) “research and the intersection of scientific (watery) knowledge and artistic interventions, so he very much approaches water less from a natural scientific perspective than from a shape-shifting transdisciplinarian one (undergirded by anthropology)”. Compared to Richard’s, my interest lies in rivers and water more from an angle of sculpting, art, and physical geography. I find movements of sediments, fluvial forms and processes inspiring and fascinating. I look at them as a metaphor to artist sculpting, building objects. (Question of conscious sculpting and process comes up at this point).

TransActing The Rivers Project 04w

Our stall named The Rivers Project was painted white and The Flowing Roots sculpture grew right through it. The aim for this one-day collaboration between Richard and I was to create discussions about rivers, water, and ecology. We traded water for words into our Water Word Harvest. We asked two questions. What does water mean to you? Do you have your own nature, a place where you go to relax outdoors? Thank you to all people who engaged with our stall! Thank you for the debates and chats. They were indeed very inspiring, interesting, and useful.

TransActing The Rivers Project 06w

TransActing The Rivers Project 01w

TransActing The Rivers Project 03w

TransActing The Rivers Project 05w

TransActing The Rivers Project 07w

TransActing The Rivers Project 08w

TransActing The Rivers Project 09w

What’s next for The Rivers Projects? Richard and I will work together again and I’m beginning to write a dissertation, which will be drip-fed by the Water Word Harvest, critical thinking, evaluation, and partly by amazing River Thames cartoons by John Leech (1817–1864), who was an English caricaturist and illustrator. Check out this amazing piece on Wikipedia.

I have one regret looking back at the event. 60+ amazing stallholders had lots to offer and engage with. We were in our water-bubble all day and didn’t have enough time to speak to all the others. Just look at the variety of projects on the day here.

TransActing happened on Saturday July 11, 2015, 12 – 5 pm, at Rootstein Hopkins Parade Ground, located between Tate Britain and Chelsea College of Arts. Thank you to Critical Practice, who organized it! Check out this photo to see the stalls on the day from high above.

I’ve applied for a number of events, competitions, and a residency this summer and one set of good news came through. I’ll be taking part in #TransActing: Market of Values event, on Saturday July 11, 2015, 12 – 5pm, at Rootstein Hopkins Parade Ground, located between Tate Britain and Chelsea College of Arts.

This is a description of the event taken from Critical Practice website, who organised the event.

“This bustling pop-up market will feature artists, designers, publishers, civil-society groups, academics, ecologists, activists and others who creatively explore existing structures of evaluation and actively produce new ones. Organised by Critical Practice, #TransActing will take place on the historic Rootstein Hopkins Parade Ground, located between Tate Britain and Chelsea College of Arts. The Market will showcase skillshares, freegan cafes, an auction, a blood donation bank, expert and enthusiast knowledge, an estate agent and other resources. Diverse forms of value production will animate economies beyond the financial.
Care, trust, creativity and generosity are forms of exchange that coexist with money but cannot be made equivalent to pounds and pence. It’s wealth beyond capital that will be produced at #TransActing.”

Image credit: Critical Practice, PARADE, a previous project by Critical Practice, Chelsea College of Arts, London, 2010

Image credit: Critical Practice.  PARADE, a previous project by Critical Practice, Chelsea College of Arts, London, 2010

I’ll have a stall which will be designed for the event. I’ll present my sculptural installation ‘Flowing Roots’ and will engage in discussions about WATER, about the amazing processes that happen in fluvial systems, and much more. I’m in a process of inviting a scientist / hydrologist / geomorphologist / PhD student in related fields to accompany me during the event to contribute to the discussions and potentially collaborate with me in the future. If you know anyone or you’d like to express your interest to join me, please email me on silviakrupinska@gmail.com.

I’m looking forward to seeing you all at #TransActing. Come for a chat and tell me what will you be doing this summer. See you!

#TransActing: Market of Values

Saturday July 11, 2015, 12 – 5pm 

at Rootstein Hopkins Parade Ground, located between Tate Britain and Chelsea College of Arts.

Tube: Pimlico

Help me to support Nepal Please.
From MAY 1- MAY 7, I’m donating all profits from sales on krupinskart to Nepal. Prices from £17.99 – £325 and all shipping free everywhere! You’ll be notified via email how much from your purchase I’m going to donate. PLEASE HELP ME TO SUPPORT THIS CAUSE.http://krupinskart.tictail.com/
Graphic design: Samo Carnoky, a Slovak artist, who is helping to promote the cause. Thank you Lucia Benicka for your tireless efforts to help Nepal!

For more visit:

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Damar-Expeditions-in-Himalaya/154815361221418?fref=ts

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In olden days, on the last day of April, young unmarried men would raise Maypoles in front of their girlfriends’ houses. If they did this in the 15th century in Germany, it would be considered a law-binding marrying agreement! Thankfully these days the tradition is only an excuse to meet and dance together to celebrate the arrival of spring and female beauty. Many nations have this tradition of elevating a young tree on a long wooden pole, decorated with many colourful ribbons. Check out some great international examples of Maypoles by country. But did you know artists have been making art inspired by maypoles? This tag shows some examples.

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May Installation on 10 trees in Empson street E3, London. 22 May 2013

When the ribbons from my outdoor May Installation (above) were stolen in 2013, I knew I wanted to revisit this topic again. A perfect opportunity has arrived. Mira Varg and I (both studying at UAL – CSM, MA Art and Science and are Slovak) proposed to make a May sculpture for a Student May Ball in the Embassy Of the Slovak Republic in London. We were both delighted when the Embassy liked the idea. We enjoyed our collaboration a lot!

Maypole sculpture 2015 06

Maypole sculpture 2015 03

Maypole sculpture 2015 01

Maypole sculpture 2015 04

We’d like to thank The Embassy Of the Slovak Republic and The Embassy of The Czech Republic for this year’s Students May Ball, which happened last night. So many amazing people turned up, lots of beer was consumed and much traditional food was eaten! And I think I speak for all that attended when I say, we had a great time! I’ll finish off with these images of folk dancing by Morena Dance Company below. Thanks for reading this post and I hope to see you maybe during one of the future events in the Embassy. Take care. S.

Studentsky majales 2015 01 Studentsky majales 2015 02 Studentsky majales 2015 03 Studentsky majales 2015 04

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