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Hello nature, art, and outdoor enthusiasts! I’m doing a walk in Walthamstow Wetlands on Sunday 20th November, at 12-2pm. Book your free ticket here.

The walk is happening in conjunction with a sculptural installation Floating Reedbed in Tracing Wastelands group exhibition (The Depot Clapton). The exhibition evolved through a collaboration between MA Art and Science at Central Saint Martins, and the Government Office for Science. This walk is kindly supported by London Wildlife Trust’s Lead Community Engagement Volunteer Stephen Ayers.

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Credits: Steel, plaster, paint or Floating Reedbed (2016) by Silvia Krupinska

 

Arrive 11.50am – 12.00pm. Meeting at the Ferry Lane entrance to the reservoirs opposite the Ferry Boat Inn, outside the Thames Water Rangers’ office. Nearest tube station is Tottenham Hale and Blackhorse Road. It is about 7 min walk from both stations. Buses are available. (Please note you must book a free ticket as places are limited. Thank you.)

Start 12.00pm
Walk through Walthamstow Wetlands
 Finish 2.00pm (and then you can join me to see the exhibition after, if you like  :).

*Adults only as the site is still in development. No dogs allowed except guide dogs and assistance dogs. If you wish to extend your visit after our official time (12-2pm) you will need to purchase a day birdwatcher’s pass £1 from the Ranger’s Office. (Cash only) The places on the walk are strictly available only by booking a free ticket. On the occasion that you no longer can join us and you booked your free ticket, please release the ticket.

Book your free ticket here.

To find out more about the exhibition and its location, follow this link to another blog post. Many thanks, see you soon!

 

15057842_10154456703608780_1307977250_nThe first in a series of exhibitions, Tracing Wastelands focuses on the materiality of waste and how human agency plays a vital role in this transition. Teasing out strands of the same chord, the exhibiting artists have investigated scientific, social and cultural perspectives, evolving a range of methodologies to what the concept of waste means, and our responsibility towards it.

Tracing Wastelands is an exhibition of work, evolved through a collaboration between MA Art and Science, Central Saint Martins, and the Government Office for Science.

Exhibiting artists are:

Julius Colwyn | Silvia Krupinska | Beckie Leach | Hannah Scott | Stephanie Wong | Jennifer Crouch

Curated by: Ellie Armstrong and Julius Colwyn

The Depot, 38 Upper Clapton Road,  London, E5 8BQ

18 November – 20 November

Opening Times: 
Friday 18th : 6pm-9pm Private View
Saturday 19th : 12-6pm
Sunday 20th : 12-6pm
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To accompany the exhibition a walk will be taking place in Walthamstow Wetlands led by me. The walk will be focusing on exploring reedbeds and their function, acting as living natural filtration devices and much more. An expert from the field will join us on the day. Free, booking required as space is limited: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/reedbeds-of-walthamstow-wetlands-walk-tickets-29203217610

I was commissioned by Manor House Development Trust to bring one of my art workshops to the Hidden River Festival in London this weekend. The festival is situated beside a spectacular Woodberry Wetlands Reserve and New River, which carries a long stream of history, first dating back to 1613.

Draw with sand and create new rivers workshop grabbed the attention of children and their parents, taking part and learning a new art technique. I bring you some images from the day. We all had lots of fun.

If you would like to include my workshop in your festival or an event, let me know on silviakrupinska(at)gmail(dot)com, and we can discuss it further. Thank you.

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What are you doing this Saturday from 12-18:30? Hidden River Festival is taking place in a marvelous location beside the New River Path, near the East and West reservoirs at Woodberry Down. The Hidden River Festival is a free annual waterside event, giving local people a chance to enjoy a mix of live music, food stalls, art and fun for all the family with the aim of connecting the communities living alongside the New River, which runs through Hackney and Haringey. The festival is organized by Manor House Development Trust and the schedule looks pretty busy. 🙂

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I’ll be present at the festival as I’m doing a Draw with Sand – Create New Rivers workshop and selling small works of art, drawings, prints and KAJ – Krupinska Abalone Jewellery. This will be a good opportunity for any first-time art buyers to start a collection with an affordable piece of art.

 

I feel for our rivers, the veins of our lives and society. I’m incurably curious about where water comes from and how it is cleaned, appearing by magic in our taps! My Draw with Sand – Create New Rivers workshop gives us an opportunity to learn about our local water spaces and where tap water in Woodberry Down comes from. We are lucky to have Woodberry and Walthamstow Wetlands Nature Reserves on our doorstep. You can talk to me about your experiences walking outdoors while you learn to draw with sand and make your very own river drawing. You can get inspired by the maps of local water shapes, or simply create a phantasy river or lake from shades of sand and abalone mother of pearl flakes.

Competition for all participants: There will be a chance for all taking part to win a mini mountain lake artwork. I’ll pull a winner out of a hat at 5pm the same day.

I’ll be sharing a gazebo with a fantastic bio artist and friend Mellissa Fisher! Her workshop titled Microbial Me will give you a chance to create a microbial self-portrait! There is going to be so much happening. You can check out the festival program just below.

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HIDDEN RIVER FESTIVAL – SATURDAY 10th SEPTEMBER 2016 – 12:00 – 18:30

From Redmond Community Centre, along the canal paths of the New River on the East and West Reservoir and Lordship Road, Woodberry Down Estate – Kayani Avenue, N4 2HF

www.hiddenriverfestival.co.uk, www.facebook.com/events/273312146376886/

 

It’s been fun this weekend. I was transported back to our MA Art and Science Degree Show at CSM, as I was editing a video to be part of my application for International Student Innovation Award. Wish me luck. Hopefully, this 4 min video sketch will give an insight of what the Studio Hide installation was like at CSM. Until it is installed somewhere else 🙂

What’s next? I’ll be presenting a Pecha Kucha style presentation at Walking Artists’ event at Somerset House this summer on Sunday 17 July during 11.30 – 12.30 slot. Look for more in the links below. Drop in if you have time, it should be fun!

Facebook event and Somerset House Walking Women event week

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A year ago Mira Varg and I created a sculpture for Embassy of the Slovak Republic in London. This post from earlier describes it. On Monday 11 May a very interesting invitation arrived from the same Embassy. Artists Mira Varg, Mandy Hreus and I, all taking MA Art and Science and Slovakian, were invited to exhibit there, with a little over a week till the opening! How could we refuse such a challenge? Those had been amongst the most exciting days this year for me. The planning, the install of the show has given us a pretty good boost and practice for approaching Unfolding Realities degree show in May.

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To view One Country Three Worlds images on Facebook, follow this link.

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One Country Three Worlds (20 April–27 May 2016) is an exhibition by three Slovak artists living and creating in the UK. Hreus, Krupinska and Varg met while studying for their MA in Art & Science at Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts London and show their work at the Embassy of the Slovak Republic for the first time, while simultaneously preparing for their degree show in May. One Country Three Worlds is a celebration of three different interpretations of the world by three creative minds originating from the same country – Slovakia.

While embracing their differences, the three artists have something in common. They are intrigued by the individual and collective perception and experience of our surroundings. Varg is reflecting on variations of realities and how we humanly observe them, Krupinska is focusing on the texture of landscape and hidden places, and Hreus is investigating the visible and invisible electromagnetic spectrum in relation to consciousness and pure expansive awareness. These interpretations unfold in a palette of media, ranging from photography, print to sculpture and installation.”

DATES: Wed 20th April – Fri 27th May 2016
LOCATION: Embassy of Slovakia, 25 Kensington Palace Gardens, London W8 4QY
OPENING TIMES: Monday–Friday 13:00–15:00| 25–27 May extended 9:00–15:00, 20 May closed due to an event taking place.

FREE ENTRY

#1country3worlds

PLEASE RING BELL ‘RECEPTION’ TO ACCESS THE EXHIBITION. THANK YOU!

Facebook event

Press release link

 

Over past months, a lot of exciting has happened. I’ve dived into Walthamstow Wetlands research and met some fantastic people in and outside of my MA Art and Science at CSM. One of which is my valued collaborator Dr Johanne Orchard-Webb, Research Fellow, Lee Valley Team of Hydrocitizenship – arts and humanities project funded by AHRC. It has been a true pleasure to exchange ideas and experiences with Jo. She has written a fantastic post about the ways how our collaboration has developed and what it has entailed so far.

Dr Jo Orchard-Webb wrote:

“While we have used different approaches to exploring ideas around what we call ‘hydrocitizenship’, there is a good deal of common ground in our thematic findings, and this ongoing process of research collaboration has for me highlighted the importance of multi-disciplinary teams working together to explore and understand hydro-social relations.”

To read the full post and find out more, please click on the following link.

Many thanks

‘Fisherman’s Flies’ by Silvia Krupinska. Image taken at Walthamstow Wetlands, on one of the orientation walks organised by London Wildlife Trust.

Fisherman's Flies by Silvia Krupinska 2016

It’s been now six months since I’ve discovered Walthamstow Wetlands. The place has become my research and relaxation hub. I normally announce most of my news on Twitter (@silviakrupinska), but it’s about time I touched down here, on my blog. The truth is, apart from my MA Art and Science dissertation (pictured below) which I handed in early February, I haven’t done much other writing lately. On the other hand, I’ve been focusing on my sketchbook and thinking about my degree show concept.

Silvia Krupinska Dissertation Cover MA Art and Science 2016

Silvia Krupinska sketchbook 2016 01

Silvia Krupinska sketchbook 2016 02

February and March have been very dynamic, indeed. We’ve done extremely successful degree show fundraising  art and science themed workshops.

Another bit of big news is that Government Office for Science invited us, CSM MA Art and Science, to collaborate with them on a report about waste. Five of us gave a series of 5 min presentations about our work and what we get to do on our MA, at GO-Science offices in London. My contribution was a presentation from my journies in Walthamstow Wetlands, as a taster really, there is so much to tell. The slideshow below is a selection of images from that presentation. It’s rather early days for this collaboration. I’ll bring more details in another post as it develops. One thing assured, it is very exciting!

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Meanwhile, there is another event coming up this Friday, 18 March 2016 at Vestry House Museum in Walthamstow. Organised by Love the Lea, Thames 21 campaign to save the rivers of the Lea catchment, who invited me to participate.Love the Lea event March 2016

I’ll bring a large map drawing of Walthamstow Wetlands to the event, and with it, I’ll create an installation to lead people on my journeys. I’ll have collected specimen samples, lots of printed images for visitors to browse, and I can give you tips on what are the most interesting corners to explore in the wetlands, the way I see it. If the weather permits, I’m also going to install my thorny stick ladder in the garden.

It would be great to see you there. Come for a chat and I’ll tell you the ladder’s story.

Until then, take care. S.

Love the Lea Late, Silvia Krupinska indoor installation proposal, detail 02

Love the Lea Late, Silvia Krupinska outdoor installation proposal 01

 

 

Q-Art invited me to present at their open crit, back in November. It all took a place in Mall Galleries, London. After I briefly introduced my art and research influenced by a variation of water themes I asked questions relating to my degree show planning for May 2016 when my MA Art and Science will culminate. The feedback, comments and suggestions have been really useful. Thank you to all that contributed. Thank you Q-Art! For more images visit this link. Cheers!

String Ladder, Mall Galleries, Q Art 06

 

I have been visiting Walthamstow Wetlands in London for the past month: watching the birds, studying where our local tap water comes from and using the area around the reservoirs as my art studio – all part of my ongoing The Rivers Project. The exhibition The Rivers Project – ‘Flow in Progress’ in Leytonstone Library (6 Church Lane, London E11 1HG), which contains a series of photographic studies and collections created on my walks there. You can see those works in three original Art Deco cabinets until 31 October.

Cormorant Island, 2015 (detail), Silvia Krupinska

Cormorant Island, 2015 (detail), Silvia Krupinska

The installation in the large cabinet is called Cormorant Island (detail above), inspired by a couple of islands in Walthamstow Wetlands. The two window cabinets include some photographs from dipping the bramble hoop (now part of Cormorant Island installation) in the reservoirs on different days, capturing those moments in time and studying light, colour and movement. Each piece included in this show has a story behind it, whether that is of making, walking, spending time outdoors or meditating. Visit Walthamstow Wetlands and see for yourself…

Bramble Hoop in Coppermill Stream, 2015, Silvia Krupinska

Bramble Hoop in Coppermill Stream, 2015, Silvia Krupinska

Exhibition dates: 13.09.2015 – 31.10.2015

13.09. 2015, 12.00 pm – 4.00 pm and then on during normal library opening times:

Monday to Friday: 9am to 7pm
Saturday: 9am to 6pm
Sunday: 12 to 4pm

Follow news and updates:
Twitter: @silviakrupinska #theriversproject
Website: http://krupinska.wix.com/theriversproject
Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/silvia-krupinska

Grey Heron 02Pictures from trip 4 at Walthamstow Wetlands working on The Rivers Project. Apart from the bedeguar gall (the red fluffy thing below), herons were very approachable this time to my surprise. I was thrilled to have used my binoculars for the first time, too! It was truly one of the exceptional days.

Image below: Diplolepis rosae is not a lichen which I thought first. It’s an insect nest. Who would have thought? Read more about it here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diplolepis_rosae

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This heron was standing in apparently its favourite spot. I’ve seen at least half dosen small fish trapted in his beak and eaten. You can just about to see one tiny fish in his beak in this photo too.

The Rivers Project at Work_ photo Paulo Estriga 01

“What are you cooking?” My boyfriend asked. “I’m making some berry inks, of course!” I answered.

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Cooking the berries and the leaves to extract the colour for the inks. I’ve added a bit of vinegar to stabilize the colour, which might slow down the colour fading too.

inks and testing 01

Testing of inks and left over pulp on paper

Medlar berries 03

Can’t find which berry this is. Anyone?

Elder berries 02

Elderberry

Dried brown plant 01

Dried brown plant of unknown name. Do you know it?

Blueberries 09

Blackberry

Purple Loosestrife 01

Purple Loosestrife

Thistle seeds 02

Thistle seeds

Thistle seeds 03

Thistle seeds

Sample of berry inks 01

Here you can see how different the colours look compared to the testing on the image higher up. The blackberry changed much darker and the top line with elderberry darkened but kept its red accents. The yellow tea like stains are from on the right mixed leaves and on the left a random mix.

Mixed leaves 01

Mixed leaf selection

Inks 03

Now I need to use the inks, more about that soon, cheers!

The Rivers Project continues and this time I’m focusing my energy on a local place, oppose to one abroad in Slovakia. This new body of small scale works will be exhibited in a very local event too. The Leytonstone Library has been closed for a while, but it’s due to reopen with a big launch on Saturday 12th September. Once it’s open, my works will be on display for about a month, details are to be seen. I have no time to spare to be ready on time! Come and walk with me! And of course, please join us at the big opening in Leytonstone, if you are around! The series begins…

Here I am :

You can listen to my sound notes from the third visit in Walthamstow Wetlands on recorded on 16th August 2015. This is best to listen if you need to relax or just escape for a while. No rushing there but simple explorations. The notes are unedited and leave about 20 min to hear it in full. When I refer to a bird family of Bitterns, now I know they were Moots actually!

Canadian goose 02

Canada Goose, Walthamstow Wetlands, 16.08.2015

Canadian geese family 03

Canada Geese family, Walthamstow Wetlands, 13.08.2015

Blueberries 05

Those blackberries I’m talking about in the recording.

Creeping thistle 01

I’ve collected some thistle seeds. They are so soft!

Canadian gees picking on blackberries 04

Geese munching on blackberries, Walthamstow Wetlands, 13.08.2015.

Swans 03

Two beautiful Mute Swans, Walthamstow Wetlands, 11.08.2015.

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My favourite willow tree at Walthamstow Wetlands, 13.08.2015

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My favourite willow tree touching the water and creating some shelter from the rain. Thankfully! At Walthamstow Wetlands, 13.08.2015

Rainny day and canadian geese 09

They don’t mind the rain I think. At Walthamstow Wetlands, 13.08.2015

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Ever so shy Grey Heron at Walthamstow Wetlands, 16.08.2015

Common tern and gulls 02

Common tern (right) and gulls.

Cormorant island 01

Cormorant island at Walthanstow Wetlands, 13.08.2015.





This is a report I wrote for The UAL Postgraduate Community newsletter and blog. You can also read it directly in a slightly edited version here.

I’m a big fan of Postgraduate Community’s trips and events, I often attend when I can. This time it was Professor Rob Kesseler, UAL Chair of Art, Design & Science who was proposing to take 10 students to The Microscience Microscopy Congress 2015 in Manchester for free!! I’m studying on MA Art &Science, but my background is in art. This presented a perfect opportunity to see The Frieze Art Fair of microscopy, and an opportunity to engage with scientists and see their world.
We arrived in Manchester on Wednesday midday, July 1st on a cool air-conditioned train, which, believe me, was much appreciated, as that was the hottest day of the year! After a short walk, observing the architecture we arrived at Manchester Central. The bustle of science minds had started. The exhibition hall was filled with top new microscopy inventions and leading experts in the fields.

I wanted to just get a feel for such a place. My recent, The Rivers Project was my excuse to talk with the brainy scientists and listen to their “foreign” language. I explained why I was there and that I hoped to find a collaborator, to gain an insight to what’s hiding in a riverbed of a river I was studying at the time. When I failed to define a precise reason why I needed the microscopy to help me to progress my work, then I saw an exhibitor from France, a company called Digital Surf. You know that feeling when you can finally visualize your idea? Talking with them, ever so friendly as all the exhibitors, I knew this company might be helpful. We exchanged our business cards and now after a couple of emails, there seems to be a great chance we will collaborate on The Rivers Project with their software. But even, if this doesn’t work out, the approachable attitude of the scientists there and all the thought-provoking chats we had, individually, or the whole group of us from UAL, was definitely worth it!

Thank you for engaging with my blog, and please feel to leave any comments below the image.
MMC2015 Digital Surf

Digital Surf exhibition stand at MMC 2015

When I saw a public call for stallholders at #TransActing: A Market of Values by Critical Practice, I thought it looked like a very unusual event. It wasn’t an art fair, nor an exhibition, it wasn’t a normal market either. A new concept of re-evaluating, transacting, exchanging, and giving sounded like something I’d love to engage with.

TransActing flyer

You can read about the thrill of being chosen to participate at TransActing in my previous blog here.

I’d like to say a big thank you to Joey O’Gorman, Research Affiliate, MA Art and Science at CSM, UAL. Joey introduced me to a social scientist, geographer Richard Bater with whom I collaborated during the #TransActing: A Market of Values event. Richard’s work focuses on (as he described it) “research and the intersection of scientific (watery) knowledge and artistic interventions, so he very much approaches water less from a natural scientific perspective than from a shape-shifting transdisciplinarian one (undergirded by anthropology)”. Compared to Richard’s, my interest lies in rivers and water more from an angle of sculpting, art, and physical geography. I find movements of sediments, fluvial forms and processes inspiring and fascinating. I look at them as a metaphor to artist sculpting, building objects. (Question of conscious sculpting and process comes up at this point).

TransActing The Rivers Project 04w

Our stall named The Rivers Project was painted white and The Flowing Roots sculpture grew right through it. The aim for this one-day collaboration between Richard and I was to create discussions about rivers, water, and ecology. We traded water for words into our Water Word Harvest. We asked two questions. What does water mean to you? Do you have your own nature, a place where you go to relax outdoors? Thank you to all people who engaged with our stall! Thank you for the debates and chats. They were indeed very inspiring, interesting, and useful.

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What’s next for The Rivers Projects? Richard and I will work together again and I’m beginning to write a dissertation, which will be drip-fed by the Water Word Harvest, critical thinking, evaluation, and partly by amazing River Thames cartoons by John Leech (1817–1864), who was an English caricaturist and illustrator. Check out this amazing piece on Wikipedia.

I have one regret looking back at the event. 60+ amazing stallholders had lots to offer and engage with. We were in our water-bubble all day and didn’t have enough time to speak to all the others. Just look at the variety of projects on the day here.

TransActing happened on Saturday July 11, 2015, 12 – 5 pm, at Rootstein Hopkins Parade Ground, located between Tate Britain and Chelsea College of Arts. Thank you to Critical Practice, who organized it! Check out this photo to see the stalls on the day from high above.

Help me to support Nepal Please.
From MAY 1- MAY 7, I’m donating all profits from sales on krupinskart to Nepal. Prices from £17.99 – £325 and all shipping free everywhere! You’ll be notified via email how much from your purchase I’m going to donate. PLEASE HELP ME TO SUPPORT THIS CAUSE.http://krupinskart.tictail.com/
Graphic design: Samo Carnoky, a Slovak artist, who is helping to promote the cause. Thank you Lucia Benicka for your tireless efforts to help Nepal!

For more visit:

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Damar-Expeditions-in-Himalaya/154815361221418?fref=ts

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In olden days, on the last day of April, young unmarried men would raise Maypoles in front of their girlfriends’ houses. If they did this in the 15th century in Germany, it would be considered a law-binding marrying agreement! Thankfully these days the tradition is only an excuse to meet and dance together to celebrate the arrival of spring and female beauty. Many nations have this tradition of elevating a young tree on a long wooden pole, decorated with many colourful ribbons. Check out some great international examples of Maypoles by country. But did you know artists have been making art inspired by maypoles? This tag shows some examples.

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May Installation on 10 trees in Empson street E3, London. 22 May 2013

When the ribbons from my outdoor May Installation (above) were stolen in 2013, I knew I wanted to revisit this topic again. A perfect opportunity has arrived. Mira Varg and I (both studying at UAL – CSM, MA Art and Science and are Slovak) proposed to make a May sculpture for a Student May Ball in the Embassy Of the Slovak Republic in London. We were both delighted when the Embassy liked the idea. We enjoyed our collaboration a lot!

Maypole sculpture 2015 06

Maypole sculpture 2015 03

Maypole sculpture 2015 01

Maypole sculpture 2015 04

We’d like to thank The Embassy Of the Slovak Republic and The Embassy of The Czech Republic for this year’s Students May Ball, which happened last night. So many amazing people turned up, lots of beer was consumed and much traditional food was eaten! And I think I speak for all that attended when I say, we had a great time! I’ll finish off with these images of folk dancing by Morena Dance Company below. Thanks for reading this post and I hope to see you maybe during one of the future events in the Embassy. Take care. S.

Studentsky majales 2015 01 Studentsky majales 2015 02 Studentsky majales 2015 03 Studentsky majales 2015 04

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